Skip to main content

Department of Pediatrics

Infectious Disease Fellowship

Infectious Disease Fellowship

Program Goals

Our Vision: To develop the future leaders in pediatric infectious diseases research, clinical care, and teaching.

Our Mission: Our fellowship training program prepares individuals to excel as academic researchers and leaders in the field of Pediatric Infectious Diseases by providing exceptional research opportunities, diverse clinical and educational experiences, and individualized mentorship.

Research Training

Fellows choose to link with University of Washington faculty members at Seattle Children’s HospitalSeattle Children’s Research Institute, the University of Washington, or the Fred Hutchinson Cancer Research Institute. The fellowship program assists each trainee to develop research objectives suited to his/her interests that lead to the development of an independent research program.

Clinical Training

Fellows acquire clinical expertise in Infectious Diseases through direct patient care as a consultant, didactic teaching, and participation in conferences. Fellows emerge with extensive experience in management of a wide variety of infections, including bacterial, viral, fungal, and parasitic infections in previously healthy children, as well as surgical and immunocompromised patients.

Values

We believe that the diversity of our fellows, residents, medical students, staff and faculty is a fundamental element of our ability to ensure that all our patients and families receive the highest-quality care – no matter their race, ethnicity, language, literacy, age, gender, gender identity, sexual orientation, religion, disability or finances. Our objective is to create a community that encourages participation and connection, and that values and includes each individual's unique contribution, in every aspect of our mission and practice. The University of Washington has pledged to fight and dismantle systemic racism within our institutions, our policies, and our practice of medicine. Our Infectious Diseases faculty are likewise engaged in and committed to this effort, incorporating an equity lens during our quality improvement work and morbidity and mortality conferences, addressing our internal policies, and partnering with others to address systemic racism in our research. We are fortunate to have a number of outstanding resources for these tasks in our community, including the University of Washington Center for Health Equity, Diversity and Inclusion, the Network of Underrepresented Residents and Fellows, the Seattle Children's Center for Diversity and Health Equity, and Dr. Jason Deen, the Department of Pediatrics Associate Vice Chair for Equity, Diversity and Inclusion.

Welcome message for applicants from the Program Director

Prospective Residents & Fellows

Seattle Children’s Hospital

Resident Tour of Hospital

Research

Message from Dr. Walker-Harding

 

Curriculum

Contents:

Clinical Training

Inpatient Care: The core of the training program is the inpatient service at Seattle Children's Hospital, a quaternary care center with a referral base including five states. Find more data on our patient demographics here. The spectrum of disease is broad, ranging from infections in healthy children to those in bone marrow or solid organ transplantation recipients.

Outpatient Care: Fellows participate in the outpatient management of patients in the General Infectious Diseases, HIV/Virology and Immunology Clinics. Fellows evaluate new consults and provide continuity of care for patients discharged from the inpatient services.

Clinical Laboratory Training:Fellows participate in formal laboratory training sessions in the microbiology and virology labs during their first year. This intensive training experience is complemented by regular interaction with the microbiology labs during the inpatient rotations at Seattle Children's Hospital.

Teaching Conferences: Weekly teaching conferences include clinical cases in pediatric infectious diseases (twice monthly), interactive teaching sessions focused on a core clinical topics (twice monthly), all-city infectious diseases clinical case conference (weekly) and Infectious Diseases board review (weekly), journal club (monthly), pediatric infectious disease board review course, and integrated quality improvement/antimicrobial stewardship conferences (monthly).

An example clinical schedule during fellowship can be found here.

Clinical Training Elements

The majority of clinical training for fellows occurs in the first year of fellowship, but some clinical training can occur during all three training years. This training includes:

Inpatient Consultative Service:

  • 32-40 weeks on inpatient consult service at Seattle Children's Hospital
  • 4 weeks of training may be spent at University-affiliated hospitals including Harborview Medical Center (where the regional trauma and burn units are located) and University of Washington/Fred Hutchinson Cancer Research Center (FHCRC) Bone Marrow Unit
  • Additional elective rotations are arranged on an individual basis
  • Weekly clinical schedule

Outpatient Clinics:

  • 4 months of outpatient virology / infectious diseases & immunology clinics

Clinical laboratory training:

  • 2 weeks of rotations in diagnostic bacteriology, mycology and virology laboratories

Teaching conferences:

  • Two-week orientation to the management of patients with infectious diseases
  • Ongoing teaching conferences including:
    • Clinical Case conferences
    • Fellow and faculty led interactive teaching sessions on core topics in Pediatric Infectious Disease
    • Weekly City-Wide clinical case discussions in infectious diseases

Goals and Objectives

 

Fellows Lecture Curriculum

In addition to discussion of clinical cases, fellows will receive formal didactic training covering a broad range of issues in pediatric infectious diseases guided by the content specifications of the American Board of Pediatrics, including (but not limited to) the following:

  • Antifungal agents: Pharmacology, uses of different agents in different scenarios
  • Anti-microbial prophylaxis: Rationale for antimicrobial prophylaxis and choice of antimicrobials in endocarditis, rheumatic fever, urinary tract infections, sickle cell anemia, Antimicrobial Stewardship Program
  • Catheter & VP shunt infections: Medical management, fungal shunt infections, indications for shunt removal, intrathecal antibiotics
  • Congenital/Neonatal: Management of the pre-treated infant, ill infants, high-risk infants who have been pre-treated, adequately or inadequately
  • Cost-containment and quality improvement: How policies related to cost-containment and quality control are developed and implemented
  • Cystic Fibrosis ID issues: Burkholderia and atypical mycobacterial infections, resistant pseudomonas infections
  • Equity, diversity, and inclusion
  • Fungal infections in BMT patients: Aspergillus, candida
  • Fungemia in non-BMT patients
  • Herpes Simplex virus infections: Neonatal HSV, HSV encephalitis, diagnosis and management
  • HIV & antiretrovirals
  • Infection control and bioterrorism
  • Infectious endocarditis: Culture-negative endocarditis, prosthetic valve endocarditis, fungal endocarditis, complications of endocarditis
  • Public health and quarantine issues: How infectious diseases expertise is brought to bear in the public health department
  • Respiratory tract infections
  • Surgical infections: Necrotizing fasciitis, complicated post-operative wound infections, infections post-dirty bowel surgery
  • Sexually Transmitted Diseases: Diagnosis and management of common STD's in the U.S. and the developing world, additional didactic lectures/board review is provided in conjunction with the Internal Medicine training program at the University of Washington
  • Transplant related concerns
  • Travel medicine and food-borne illnesses: Tick-borne infections, malaria
  • Tuberculosis: Gastrointestinal TB, tuberculous osteomyelitis, tuberculous meningitis, and complicated pulmonary tuberculosis, indications for steroid usage
  • Vaccines: Rationale for use of vaccines, and historical perspective, adverse reactions
  • Viral infections in BMT patients: Herpesviruses, parainfluenza, RSV

 

Research Training

An individualized program is developed to provide each fellow a strong research foundation to build an investigative career.

 

Research Training Elements

Mentor Selection: Selection of a research project prior to acceptance to the fellowship program is not required. During the interview process, applicants are exposed to the breadth of faculty expertise available in our program and potential research projects. Upon acceptance into our program, fellows work with the research director to develop their research focus further, identify specific mentors of faculty at the University of Washington, Seattle Children’s Hospital, Seattle Children’s Research Institute, or the Fred Hutchinson Cancer Research Institute. The fellowship director and research director discuss training expectations with both the mentor and fellow to optimize the research project selected by the fellow. The research mentor will foster the ultimate development of an independent research program for the fellow.

Project Scope: Fellows may work with any University of Washington faculty member including our core pediatric infectious disease faculty listed below. Fellows may select projects related to basic research, patient-oriented research or population-based research. Our fellowship is supported by a training-grant from the NIH that supports training of fellows in basic and/or translational research. The research project work should be able to be completed within two years and result in a publication in a peer-reviewed journal by the completion of fellowship. The project should also provide a foundation for a career development grant and future research programs. When needed, our program works closely with fellows to secure funding for a third year of focused research time immediately following fellowship completion..

Coursework: Research is supplemented by coursework at the University of Washington as necessary. Fellows may pursue an MPH if the coursework is appropriate for their career goals. Degree completion takes approximately two years.

Sample Research Trajectory

The following sample assumes a fellow without prior research experience who will complete clinical training over three years.

Before starting fellowship

Fellowship acceptance--December

  • Investigate expertise of interest in Seattle
  • Discuss potential research projects with Fellowship Director/Research Director
  • Contact potential mentors and discuss possible projects (contact facilitated by the fellowship program)
  • Narrow scope of research projects prior to starting fellowship

Year 1:

July/August:

  • Interview potential research mentors if needed and select a research project
  • Begin reading relevant background material to become familiar with the field
  • Begin research and form a scholarly oversight committee
  • Review format and process of grants and papers during orientation

September-December:

  • Continue reading and conducting initial studies
  • Clearly state research questions and specific aims of your project; Begin generating data
  • Present research plan to your scholarly oversight committee
  • Write the background section of future papers/grants
  • Begin career planning

January-June:

  • Present first research conference at Pediatric ID Research Conference
  • Continue to generate data, identify data needed for grants/publications and begin acquiring these data, troubleshoot research approach
  • Begin planning/submission process of abstracts to national meetings
  • Meet with scholarly oversight committee to discuss career progress, presentation at meetings, writing grants and papers

Year 2:

July-December:

  • Continue acquiring data; write methods sections for grants/publications
  • Identify and submit to national meetings appropriate for presentation of research
  • Identify the data required for a publication, and continue acquiring these data

January-June:

  • By the middle of the 2nd year of training, fellows should begin to design their own research plan in conjunction with their research mentor
  • Write a preliminary outline of the publication of work done in fellowship (more if you are able)
  • Submit publication by end of second year if possible
  • Present work at the Pediatric Infectious Disease Research Conference
  • Present preliminary data at a national meeting
  • Begin organizing preliminary data and drafting Hypotheses and Aims for a career development award from the NIH or a private foundation
  • Discuss career plans with program director, SOC and research mentor
  • Plan to submit Career Development Awards

Year 3:

July-December:

  • Submit initial proposal for a Career Development Award
  • Continue to generate data for publications and focused on Aims in grant proposals
  • Submit publication if not done or complete additional papers as appropriate
  • Discuss next steps in career planning with program director, and research mentors
  • Present work at a national meeting, network, continue to explore career opportunities

December-June:

  • Finalize career plans including funding options, additional grant submissions if necessary

 

Research Opportunities

RESEARCH OPPORTUNITIES in Virology

  • Marta Bull, PhD (Research Assistant Professor, Pediatrics): Primary research interest includes HIV at mucosal sites and the role that immune responses of other chronic viruses – herpes simplex virus (HSV) 1, HSV-2, and cytomegalovirus (CMV) play in HIV persistence in tissues
  • Janet A. Englund, MD (Professor of Pediatric Infectious Diseases) Respiratory virus vaccines, respiratory viruses in immunocompromised patients, respiratory viruses in children and pregnant women in developing countries, maternal immunization, new antivirals for respiratory viruses
  • Lisa Frenkel, MD (Professor of Pediatric Infectious Diseases and Laboratory Medicine; Co-Director of Pediatric Infectious Diseases Virology Clinic) Viral evolution of HIV during infection and treatment
  • Ann Melvin, MD, MPH (Associate Professor of Pediatric Infectious Diseases) Clinical studies of HIV infection (emailed)
  • Timothy M. Rose, PhD (Professor of Pediatric Infectious Diseases) Molecular biology of tumor viruses, cytokines, cell growth, differentiation & transformation (emailed)
  • Alpana Waghmare, MD (Assistant Professor, Pediatric Infectious Diseases) Clinical and laboratory studies of respiratory viruses
  • Thor Wagner, MD (Assistant Professor of Pediatric Infectious Diseases): Pediatric HIV infection which accounts for 15% of all HIV deaths
  • Danielle Zerr, MD, MPH (Division Chief, Professor of Pediatric Infectious Disease, Affiliate Investigator at the Fred Hutchinson Cancer Research Center, and the Medical Director of Infection Prevention at Seattle Children's Hospital) Dr. Zerr's research focuses on the epidemiology and prevention of healthcare-associated infections, with a particular focus on multi-drug resistant organisms. Dr. Zerr is also involved in studies of the epidemiology, diagnosis, and prevention of HHV-6 infections in healthy and immune compromised hosts
  • Don Sodora, PhD Research on understanding 1) HIV transmission and 2) HIV-induced disease and immune factors that impact progression to AIDS.

RESEARCH OPPORTUNITIES in Bacteriology

  • Rafael Hernandez, MD, PhD : (Acting Instructor, Pediatric Infectious Diseases): Host pathogen interactions in tuberculosis and other mycobacterial infections.
  • Lakshmi Rajagopal, PhD (Associate Professor of Pediatric Infectious Diseases and Microbiology) GBS infection associated fetal injury and preterm birth
  • Kevin Urdahl, MD, PhD (Assistant Professor of Pediatric Infectious Diseases) Immune response to Mycobacterium tuberculosis infection
  • Scott Weissman, MD (Associate Professor of Pediatric Infectious Diseases) Emergence and transmission of multi-drug resistance in extraintestinal pathogens including Escherichia coli and Klebsiella pneumoniae
  • Christoph Grundner, PhD Research on mapping the signaling pathways that underlie the adaptability and pathogenesis of tuberculosis.
  • David Sherman, PhD Research focused on developing novel drugs, diagnostics, and vaccines to combat tuberculosis.

RESEARCH OPPORTUNITIES in Parasitology

  • Wesley C. Van Voorhis, MD, PhD (Professor and Head, Allergy and Infectious Disease) Drug discovery for treatment of parasitic infections.
  • Stefan Kappe, PhD Research on understanding the complex biology of the malaria parasite and the immune responses to infection.
  • Alexis Kaushansky, PhD Research on malaria host-parasite interaction; host-based drug discovery; cross-pathogen studies and co-infections.
  • Peter Myler, PhD Research on Leishmania and trypanosomatids.
  • Marilyn Parsons, PhD Research on human African trypanosomiasis (also known as African sleeping sickness) and toxoplasmosis.
  • Joe Smith, PhD Research to characterize malaria-host binding interactions and to better understand malaria disease mechanisms.
  • Ken Stuart, PhD Research investigating molecular and cellular processes of Trypanosomes and Leishmania, because this can lead to the development of drugs for these parasitic diseases, and immune responses in clinical trials of malaria vaccines.

RESEARCH OPPORTUNITIES in Immunology

  • David J. Rawlings, MD (Professor of Pediatrics; Adjunct Professor of Immunology; Director, Center for Immunity and Immunotherapies; Chief, Division of Immunology) Lymphocyte signal transduction, development and function and the genetic basis for immune diseases; gene therapy and gene repair for immune and blood disorders
  • Andrew Scharenberg, MD (Professor of Pediatrics, Adjunct Professor of Immunology) Gene editing technology, adoptive immunotherapy, gene correction for blood disorders
  • Kevin Urdahl, MD, PhD (Assistant Professor of Pediatric Infectious Diseases) Immune response to Mycobacterium tuberculosis infection
  • Alan Aderem, PhD Research on the innate immune system.
  • John Aitchison, PhD Use of high-throughput quantitative ‘omics technologies with computational biology to interrogate, map, and model pathogens, host responses, and the interface between hosts and pathogens.
  • Noah Sather, PhD Research on interactions between invading pathogens and the host immune system, with the goal of leveraging these discoveries toward the development of novel vaccines and vaccination regimens.

RESEARCH OPPORTUNITIES in Antimicrobial Stewardship and Infection Prevention

  • Matthew Kronman, MD, MSCE (Associate Professor of Pediatric Infectious Diseases, Fellowship Program Director): "Epidemiology and antimicrobial use and antimicrobial stewardship, primarily employing administrative data"
  • Scott Weissman, MD (Associate Professor of Pediatric Infectious Diseases) Peer-to-peer and technological interventions to reduce preventable harm associated with inappropriate antibiotic use and collateral damage to the intestinal flora.
  • Danielle Zerr, MD, MPH (Division Chief, Professor of Pediatric Infectious Disease, Affiliate Investigator at the Fred Hutchinson Cancer Research Center, and the Medical Director of Infection Prevention at Seattle Children's Hospital) "Antimicrobial stewardship as it relates to acquisition of multi-drug resistant organisms"

RESEARCH OPPORTUNITIES in Global Health

  • Janet A. Englund, MD (Professor of Pediatric Infectious Diseases) Respiratory virus vaccines, respiratory viruses in immunocompromised patients, respiratory viruses in children and pregnant women in developing countries, maternal immunization, new antivirals for respiratory viruses
  • Lisa Frenkel, MD (Professor of Pediatric Infectious Diseases and Laboratory Medicine; Co-Director of Pediatric Infectious Diseases Virology Clinic) Persistence of HIV infection; HIV resistance to antiretrovirals
  • Jairam Lingappa, MD, PhD (Associate Director, International Clinical Research Center (ICRC); Associate Professor of Global Health and Medicine; Adjunct Associate Professor of Pediatrics; Co-Director of CFAR Repository): "Epidemiologic and molecular factors mediating host resistance to HIV"
  • Judd Walson, MD, MPH (Associate Professor, Division of Allergy and Infectious Diseases, Co-Director, AIDS Associated Infections and Malignancies Scientific Working Group, CFAR University of Washington) clinical trials evaluating the treatment and prevention of intestinal worms, malaria and diarrheal disease in delaying HIV progression; epidemiology of non-typhoidal salmonella among African children.

RESEARCH OPPORTUNITIES available with other University of Washington Faculty:

ADDITIONAL RESOURCES

 

Core Training Sites

Seattle Children's Hospital & Sand Point Clinic

Photo
Seattle Children's Hospital

Seattle Children's Hospital is both a community hospital for greater Seattle and the pediatric referral center for the Northwest providing excellent pediatric care to meet the medical, surgical and developmental needs of children in the WWAMI region. Serving as the main clinical training site for pediatric residents, this 420-bed hospital is conveniently located one and one-half miles from the University of Washington campus in an attractive, residential neighborhood of Seattle. The staff consists of University faculty and Seattle Children's full-time physicians.

Other sites include Seattle Children’s Research Institute, Harborview Medical Center, the Fred Hutchinson Cancer Research Center, and the University of Washington Medical Center.

Program Director

Matthew P. Kronman, MD, MSCE

Associate Professor, Department of Pediatrics, University of Washington School of Medicine, Seattle Children’s Hospital, Fellowship Program Director, Pediatric Infectious Diseases

PI of NIH-sponsored training grant

Kevin B. Urdahl, MD, PhD

Professor, Department of Pediatrics, University of Washington School of Medicine, Center for Global Infectious Disease Research

Faculty

Alan Aderem, PhD

Professor, Department of Pediatrics, University of Washington School of Medicine, Co-Director, Center for Global Infectious Disease Research

John Aitchison, PhD

Professor, Department of Pediatrics, University of Washington School of Medicine, Center for Global Infectious Disease Research

Marta Bull, PhD

Research Associate Professor Department of Pediatrics, University of Washington School of Medicine, Center for Global Infectious Disease Research

Janet A. M.D. Englund, MD

Professor, Department of Pediatrics, University of Washington School of Medicine, Seattle Children’s Hospital.

Lisa M. Frenkel, MD

Professor, Department of Pediatrics, University of Washington School of Medicine, Co-Director, Center for Global Infectious Disease Research

Benjamin Henry Gern, MD

Acting Instructor, Department of Pediatrics, University of Washington School of Medicine, Seattle Children’s Hospital

Christoph Grundner, PhD

Associate Professor, Department of Pediatrics, University of Washington School of Medicine, Center for Global Infectious Disease Research

Whitney E Harrington, MD, PhD

Assistant Professor, Department of Pediatrics, University of Washington School of Medicine, Seattle Children’s Hospital

Rafael E. Hernandez, MD, PhD

Assistant Professor, Department of Pediatrics, University of Washington School of Medicine, Seattle Children’s Hospital

Lucas R. Hoffman, MD, PhD

Associate Professor

Heather B Jaspan, MD, PhD

Associate Professor, Department of Pediatrics and Global Health, University of Washington School of Medicine, Seattle Children’s Hospital

Stefan Kappe, PhD

Professor, Department of Pediatrics, University of Washington School of Medicine, Center for Global Infectious Disease Research

Alexis Kaushansky, PhD

Associate Professor, Department of Pediatrics, University of Washington School of Medicine, Center for Global Infectious Disease Research

Matthew P. Kronman, MD, MSCE

Associate Professor, Department of Pediatrics, University of Washington School of Medicine, Seattle Children’s Hospital, Fellowship Program Director, Pediatric Infectious Diseases

Ann J. MD Melvin, MD

Professor, Department of Pediatrics, University of Washington School of Medicine, Seattle Children’s Hospital, Clinical Director, Division of Infectious Diseases

Jon Mosser, MD, MPH

Assistant Professor

Peter Myler, PhD

Professor, Department of Pediatrics, University of Washington School of Medicine, Center for Global Infectious Disease Research

Lakshmi Rajagopal

Professor, Department of Pediatrics, University of Washington School of Medicine, Center for Global Infectious Disease Research, Adjunct Associate Professor of Microbiology and Global Health

Noah Sather, PhD

Associate Professor, Department of Pediatrics, University of Washington School of Medicine, Center for Global Infectious Disease Research

Joe Smith, PhD

Professor, Department of Pediatrics, University of Washington School of Medicine, Center for Global Infectious Disease Research

Sherilyn Smith, MD

Professor, Department of Pediatrics, University of Washington School of Medicine, Seattle Children’s Hospital. Co-Director of Pediatric Clerkship

Don Sodora, PhD

Professor, Department of Pediatrics, University of Washington School of Medicine, Center for Global Infectious Disease Research

Caleb Stokes, MD, PhD

Acting Assistant Professor, Department of Pediatrics, University of Washington School of Medicine, Seattle Children’s Hospital

Kenneth Stuart, PhD

Professor, Department of Pediatrics, University of Washington School of Medicine, Center for Global Infectious Disease Research

Glen S. Tamura, MD, PhD

Associate Professor

Indi Trehan, MD, MPH, DTM&H

Associate Professor, Department of Pediatrics, University of Washington School of Medicine, Seattle Children’s Hospital

Kevin B. Urdahl, MD, PhD

Professor, Department of Pediatrics, University of Washington School of Medicine, Center for Global Infectious Disease Research

Ashley Vaughan, PhD

Research Assistant Professor, Department of Pediatrics, University of Washington School of Medicine, Center for Global Infectious Disease Research

Surabhi (Sara) Vora, MD, MPH

Associate Professor, Department of Pediatrics, University of Washington School of Medicine, Seattle Children’s Hospital

Alpana Waghmare, MD

Assistant Professor, Department of Pediatrics, University of Washington School of Medicine, Seattle Children’s Hospital, Research associate, Freed Hutchison Cancer Research Center

Thor A. Wagner, MD

Associate Professor, Department of Pediatrics, University of Washington School of Medicine, Seattle Children’s Hospital

Scott J. Weissman, MD

Associate Professor, Department of Pediatrics, University of Washington School of Medicine, Seattle Children’s Hospital, Medical Director, Antimicrobial Stewardship Program

Danielle Zerr, MD

Division Chief and Professor of Pediatric Infectious Disease Affiliate Investigator, Fred Hutchinson Cancer Research Center Medical Director of Infection Prevention, Seattle Children’s Hospital

Fellows and Alumni

Current Fellows

Peds ID Current Fellows
 

 

Christine Anterasian, MD

Christine Anterasian, MD

Dr. Anterasian’s primary scholarly interest is studying immunologic mechanisms of macrophage resistance to latent TB infection. She uses both bioinformatics techniques and cellular immunology to identify novel pathways in host-TB interactions. Outside of the hospital, Christine spends most of her time running, hiking, biking, and learning how to cross-country ski. 

Susan Gillis, MD

Susan Gillis, MD

Susan’s research interest includes understanding better how the body’s innate immune system interacts with pathogens, specifically in how the lungs interact with pseudomonas biofilms in patients with cystic fibrosis. Her inpatient interests include educating families on infectious diseases and partnering with families in treatment. Outside of the hospital, she enjoys spending time and hiking with her husband and two dogs, and doing acro yoga with her husband.

Caitlin McGrath, MD

Caitlin McGrath, MD

Dr. McGrath is originally from the Midwest and has lived in Seattle for six years. She completed her pediatric residency at Seattle Children’s and worked as a hospitalist prior to starting fellowship. Her research interests include healthcare-associated infections and the intersection of HAIs with health equity. Dr. McGrath’s initial fellowship research project will involve investigating inequities in CLABSI rates related to race, ethnicity, and language. Her faculty mentors are Drs. Danielle Zerr and Matthew Kronman. In order to gain skills related to her interest in healthcare epidemiology, she is pursuing a Master’s of Science in Epidemiology at the University of Washington School of Public Health.

Outside of work, she enjoys spending time with her husband, daughter, and dog. You’ll find them exploring local parks and kid-friendly destinations and expanding their knowledge of Seattle’s food scene (now via takeout!)

Erin Chung, MD

Erin Chung, MD

Dr. Chung's research interests include lower respiratory tract infections in resource limited populations. She will be working with Dr. Helen Chu's lab to explore the transmission of respiratory viruses.

Though she has trained in SoCal, the Midwest, and the East Coast, she is new to the PNW and excited to explore the area. She and her boyfriend enjoy hiking, buying too many plants, working on ceramics, and hanging out with their cat, Boots.

Brandon Maust, MD

Brandon Maust, MD

Dr. Maust is excited to be back in Seattle after Pediatrics residency at UCSF Benioff Children's Hospital Oakland. He was at UW for his undergraduate, pre-med research, and medical school, so is thrilled to be back in the Northwest where he has a new niece and eagerly awaits the safe re-opening of old haunts for food, coffee, and beer. When he is not on service or in the lab learning about the virome, he likes to bake, and read, and hike with his partner, Tim.

 

Alumni

Pediatrics ID Fellowship Alumni

Graduates of our program pursue careers in research and clinical care related to Pediatric Infectious Disease. Approximately 90% of graduates from our program in the past 15 years are conducting research related to infectious disease or are academic pediatric infectious disease physicians. Fifteen of these recent graduates obtained mentored research development awards (K-series from the NIH or their equivalent) in areas related to their fellowship projects.

Publications and Presentations from recent fellowship graduates

  • Benjamin Gern, MD
    • Gern BH, et al. Continued in vitro cefazolin susceptibility in methicillin-susceptible Staphylococcus aureus. Ann Clin Microbiol Antimicrob. 2018 Feb 20;17(1):5.
    • Gern BH, Mehta A, McCammond AN, Holmes KW, Guzman-Cottrill JA. Case 1: Vomiting and Ventricular Arrhythmia in a 2-year-old Girl. Pediatr Rev. 2018 Feb;39(2):91-92.
    • Gern BH, Adams K, Plumlee C, Gerner M, Urdahl K. TGFβ restricts T cell IFNɣ production in pulmonary tuberculous granulomas. Oral presentation: Keystone Symposia Tuberculosis: Mechanisms, Pathogenesis and Treatment 2019. Banff, Alberta, Canada
  • Whitney Harrington, MD, PhD
    • Harrington WE, et al. Maternal microchimerism predicts increased infection but decreased disease due to P. falciparum during early childhood. J Infect Dis. 2017 May 1;215(9):1445-1451.
    • Harrington WE, Kakuru A,  Jagannathan P. Malaria in pregnancy shapes the development of foetal and infant immunity. Parasite Immunol. 2019 Mar;41(3):e12573.
    • Harrington WE “MHC Class II Alleles Predict Susceptibility to Placental Malaria and Malaria during Infancy in an East African Cohort.” Gordon Research Conference: Translating Malaria Research to the Field. 7/2015 (Girona, Spain). Poster presentation.
  • Jonathan Mosser, MD, MPH
    • Mosser JF, et al. Mapping diphtheria-pertussis-tetanus vaccine coverage in Africa, 2000-2016: a spatial and temporal modelling study. Lancet. 2019 May 4;393(10183):1843-1855.
    • Mosser JF, Rao PC, Osgood-Zimmerman A, Fullman N, Graetz N, Burstein R, Updike RL, Ray SE, Earl L, Desphande A, Dwyer-Lindgren L, Lim SS, Reiner RC, Hay SI. Mapping diphtheria-tetanus-pertussis vaccine coverage in Africa, 2000-2016.  Platform presentation at the American Society of Tropical Medicine and Hygiene Annual Meeting; 2019 October 29; New Orleans, LA. Presenting author: Mosser
    • Subnational Administrative Data for Modeling. Geospatial Immunization Modeling for Equity: Summer 2019 Mosser, JF, Technical Meeting; hosted by the Equity Reference Group, Bill and Melinda Gates Foundation, and Unicef; August 15-16, 2019; Washington, DC
  • Chikara Ogimi, MD
    • Ogimi C, et al. Prolonged Shedding of Human Coronavirus in Hematopoietic Cell Transplant Recipients: Risk Factors and Viral Genome Evolution. J Infect Dis. 2017 Jul 15;216(2):203-209.
    • Ogimi C, et al. Antibiotic Prescribing and Respiratory Viral Testing for Acute Upper Respiratory Infections Among Adult Patients at an Ambulatory Cancer Center. Clin Infect Dis. 2019 May 16. pii: ciz409.
    • Ogimi C, Xie H, Campbell A, Waghmare A, Kuypers J, Jerome K, Chien J, Callais C, Cheng G, Pergam S, Leisenring W, Englund J, Boeckh M. Human Metapneumovirus or Influenza A Upper Respiratory Tract Infection Associated with Increased Risk of Bacterial Superinfection in Allogeneic Hematopoietic Cell Transplant Recipients. 2019 TCT, TX, 2/2019 (Poster. #524). Presenting author: Ogimi C.
  • Jennifer Rathe, MD, PhD
    • Rathe, JA, Miller, E.K., Halasa, N.B., Fraser, C.M., and Liggett, S.B. Community outbreak of human rhinovirus strains demonstrate high diversity at the consensus and minor mutant genome levels. Manuscript in preparation.
    • Rathe, JA. Host innate immune response to Rhinovirus infection of the upper and lower airways. Poster Presentation: Gordon Conference and Seminar ‘Biology of Acute Respiratory Infection’, March 2018. Ventura Beach, CA

How to Apply

Applicants for a position in the pediatric ID fellowship training program are encouraged to apply through Electronic Residency Application Service (ERAS). Our interview dates for 2022 positions will be between August and November 2021. All interviews will be virtual this year, and we are offering 2 positions to begin in 2022. Minorities and those under-represented in academic pediatrics are strongly encouraged to apply.

Selection of applicants will be completed by December 2021 for a July 7, 2022 fellowship start date. To be eligible for the Pediatric Infectious Disease Fellowship, funded by the National Institutes of Health, applicants must be either a United States citizen or permanent resident. Support is provided by NIH-sponsored training grants or awards from private foundations. Seattle Children's Hospital is an equal opportunity employer.

Documents to submit via ERAS include:

  • The completed Common Application Form
  • At least 3 letters of recommendation (including a program director's letter)
  • A personal statement about why you are interested in a career in infectious disease
  • A photograph
  • USMLE and /or COMPLEX transcripts
  • MSPE/Dean’s letter and medical school transcripts

Applications must be submitted online using the Electronic Residency Application Service (ERAS).

Fellowship Director (For questions regarding the Fellowship Program)

Matthew P. Kronman, MD, MSCE

Associate Professor, Department of Pediatrics, University of Washington School of Medicine, Seattle Children’s Hospital, Fellowship Program Director, Pediatric Infectious Diseases

206.987.4096 (phone)
206.987.3890 (fax)

Seattle Children's Hospital
4800 Sandpoint Way NE, M/S M.A.7.226
Seattle WA 98105

Email
Fellowship Program Administrator (For questions on application procedures)

Tanya Goetz

Fellowship Program Administrator

206.987.6352 (phone)
Email